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Little Out of Much


 
  Recently I sat in a preaching service and observed a phenomenon that is becoming more common in our present age. A preacher who was giving off the impression that he was 'preaching the Word", when he wasn't. He had taken a text from one of the prophetical books of the Old Testament and customarily began to read the text, verse by verse. Here is where the twist began. Instead of commenting on the verses, he picked out key words that he had apparently chosen to comment on. Amazingly he loosely tied the words to the base text, indicating he had some knowledge of the exposition of the text, yet evidencing that he was not familiar to the etimology of the words he was interjecting into his sermon.

  Shortly it became clear that he was following the familiar path of a normal evangelistic sermon, using those chosen words as the outline for a sermon that actually had nothing to do with the text. It was a good message for the lost and for straying saints, but it had nothing to do with an outstanding portion of scripture predicting the glorious return of Jesus to begin his victorious reign over this old earth. The preacher, expertly wove his way through the passage with a point by point sermon, yet left me disappointed in his deliberate or debilitating delivery.

  Being an older preacher, who has spent a lot of time through 62 years of ministry, connecting the dots of Biblical prophecy, I am becoming more and more convinced that much of the modern generation of younger preachers have not really studied the Word of God, but have grafted onto the studious work of past generations and are using deceptive methods to convince their unsuspecting and ignorant congregations that they are 'preachers of the Word'.
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